Day by Day



14 March 2006

The end is here...


I still owe Scoot a post on polls and their power to mislead. Howeer, I came across a great article in the Guardian on Murdoch's prophecy's for the future. In short, he states (rightly so, I believe) that the future lies with the Internet as opposed to the "Old Media". This is nothing new, however, for someone who built his own fortune in the traditional channels, this is nothing shjort of the fall of the Berlin Wall in my opinion.

I do not revel in the conversion of old media into new. I do delight in the multiple new outlets available to me at the click of a button. Some of these outlets are valuable insights into individual persona, some are good collections of information and news and yet still others fall into the "tin foil hat" category.

The opportuntity is for a group to arise which can provide certification as to the veracity and balanced nature of the new media. Much like the MPAA or ESRB ratings. I hereby propose the lamp and scale rating system. A system of lamps and scales representing the quality and equity of a site. For example a five scale and five lamp site would be dead on for factuality and equal in its presentation of all sides.

I suspect that like Diogenes, I will be searching for this site for sometime. Nonetheless, my own site might rate one scale and two and a half lamps, only as I do not work to validate every link and quotation.

4 comments:

Scootmaroo said...

And I still can't curl up on the sofa with a blog and a hot cup of joe while in my pj's on a Sunday Morning.......

Citizen Deux said...

True, true. But even now we have handheld readers for doing just that, given our wireless systems, it's doable. It's just that paper is still lighter and easier to manipulate.

Major John said...

How about a 0-5 tin-foil hat rating system?

Having been in way too many airports in my day - a newspaper and an airplane seat don't mix well. Maybe the handheld will end up triumphing with the traveler quite easily.

Citizen Deux said...

As far as airplanes, I like a nice cozy copy of the Economist. Current, full of dry British wit and generally low on the bloviating factor.